13 May 2017 – Yellow-billed Cuckoo

Haley Butler tipped me off to this Yellow-billed Cuckoo she found at the southeastern alcove of the Noble Research Center on the afternoon of 12 May. By the time I got there to check on the morning of the 13th, the cuckoo had been scavenged, evidently by a cat.

3 July 2016 – no casualties

I was away and unable to keep track of casualties at the Noble Research Center from 6/22–7/2.  On my check today (7/3), the carcasses of Tufted Titmouse, House Finch, and Yellow-billed Cuckoo were all gone. (Actually, a cuckoo wing remains but it’s time to call the carcass as removed as it’s very unlikely to be noticed at this point.) The most conservative date to ascribe for the scavenging removal trial is 6/22 which gives unofficial removal times of 7 (titmouse), 17 (finch), and 32 (cuckoo) days.

21 May 2016 – Mourning Warbler and Yellow-billed Cuckoo

With apologies for the 1) poor and 2) non-existent photos . . .

I found an ASY male Mourning Warbler (fat = 0) at the main north entrance this morning. He was waaaaay better looking than these photos attest, and I bet he was even more handsome in life.

 

In the northwest alcove lay a female (with well-developed brood patch!) Yellow-billed Cuckoo (no photo).  I left the cuckoo in place, as the ants were already doing a number on her.

 

Screen Shot 2016-05-21 at 10.46.04 AM

In scavenging news, the starling from 5/18 was both moved and eaten: I found a remnant pile of its larger feathers about 5m away from the bird’s location. Whatever picked it up had taken it south to the bushes in front of the northern entrance.

16 June 2013 – Yellow-billed Cuckoo and Northern Cardinal

(no photos)

Today I found two birds, both of which were in a state of decomposition indicating that they actually died yesterday, Jun. 15th. 

The Yellow-billed Cuckoo was interesting in that there has been something of a local movement of them over the past couple of weeks.  Last week, at least one and possibly two, died in window collisions with the Food and Agricultural Products Center just west and across a parking lot from the NRC.  I’ve also had one calling in my backyard, which is a bit unusual.  The bird I found today was also interesting in providing the first kill at an odd point on the building:  the very northwesternmost corner entry.  This is a section of the building only about 6′ wide. 

The second bird was a HY (local) Northern Cardinal male.  I found this bird at the main north entrance.

I left both birds in place to assess removal rates.

Image

That’s an interesting pattern of window kills, with the collisions seemingly concentrated on the north and west sides during (what should be) spring migration.