21 December 2017 – no casualties

Song Sparrow finally gone. It sat untouched for 20 days.

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28 November 2017 – two Dark-eyed Juncos

Both on the west side; one north and one south. Both evidently adult males, too.  I left both in place for a removal trial.

16 September 2017 – Mourning Dove

I found this hatch-year Mourning Dove in front of the main north entrance today.

24 August 2017 – Mourning Warbler and Chipping Sparrow

On the heels of an impressive southbound flight last night,

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. . . I found two casualties this morning.

There was a HY Chipping Sparrow in the northwest alcove.  The bird had evidently been stepped on or perhaps run over by a maintenance vehicle. I left it in place for a removal trial.

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Also, near the main north entrance (actually at a west-facing facade in the corner) was a Mourning Warbler. The bold eyering and long undertail coverts looked tantalyzingly like a Connecticut Warbler. It was, however, an AHY-U Mourning Warbler. The bird was 13.5g and bulging with fat (3).

 

This was the 10th Mourning Warbler on the project.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

10 August 2017 – no casualties

Both hummingbird carcasses still in evidence. The whole bird from the southeastern alcove has been decapitated, presumably by the ants.

The tail from the southwestern alcove made things a bit more interesting by being gone.  I wasn’t too surprised by that because we had storms roll through overnight that I assumed would have blown that little bit of feathers away.  So I started looking around just to see if I could figure out in which crack in the bricks it ended up.  I couldn’t find it, but my more intensive searching did turn up these tidbits:

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Aha!  So it looks like yesterday’s tail was not necessarily from a hummingbird that had been scavenged.  It looks more like a lawnmower got it. It also seems to have been a HY male, Ruby-throated Hummingbird.