8 November 2017 – Orange-crowned Warbler

Poor little sucker died at the southwestern alcove, and was stepped on.  😦

 

 

Advertisements

7–18 October 2017 – all kinds of stuff

I’ve been behind with stacks of papers to grade, and they’ve kept me from keeping up as often as I’d prefer. During the period from October 7–18, I conducted 8 surveys, skipping Oct. 8, 14, and 15. The data from these last 11 days look a bit like this:

  • Oct. 7: HOWR
  • Oct. 9: no casualties
  • Oct. 10: no casualties
  • Oct. 11: LISP
  • Oct. 12: TUTI
  • Oct. 13: no casualties
  • Oct. 16: OCWA, SOSP, LISP, and NAWA
  • Oct. 17: no casualties
  • Oct. 18: no casualties

Just past mid-October, and we are crushing the annual mortality count right now with 55 dead birds.

Oct. 7 – I found just the third House Wren on the project.  This one ended up on a warm air outflow grate from the air conditioning unit and was quickly desiccated.

Screen Shot 2017-10-12 at 5.44.08 PM

Oct. 11 – I collected this Lincoln’s Sparrow from the south portico.

Oct. 12 – This Tufted Titmouse was a surprise in the southwestern alcove.

Oct. 16 – This was not a good day for migrants. I found an Orange-crowned Warbler at the northeast alcove, a Song Sparrow at the south portico, and a Lincoln’s Sparrow at the southwestern alcove. Shortly after completing my survey, a Nashville Warbler was turned in from a collision in the southwestern alcove.

 

Screen Shot 2017-10-17 at 4.25.38 PM

 

22 April 2017 – Orange-crowned Warbler (yep, another one)

Yesterday (Friday 4/21/17) dawned stormy after an equally stormy night.  We picked up nearly 2 inches of rain (+ some hail!) and enjoyed several hours of lightning and thunder. It was dicey enough – and I busy enough – that I skipped Friday’s morning survey.

Saturday, Earth Day (!) was misty, windy, and cool but mostly dry. After a morning field trip, I checked the Noble Research Center and found the fifth Orange-crowned Warbler of the survey.  (Recall, that Thursday, 4/20, produced the fourth.) It is tantalizing  – and sad! – to think of two birds traveling together and dying together, especially considering that the collision took place at the same spot on the building.  I don’t think, however, that this ASY, fat = 0, probable female had been in place since Thursday.  She was much too dry to have lain out in the open during Friday’s deluge.  So I think she really did come in overnight and if not traveling with Thursday’s male, evidently following a similar route.

20 April 2017 – Orange-crowned Warbler

Surprisingly, the 277th casualty on this project was just the 4th Orange-crowned Warbler, which is a common migrant here in central OK. This one was an ASY male with fat = 1. I first spotted him from about 80m away.

 

Check out this guy’s truncated rectrices, blunt-tipped primary coverts, and his pointed primaries:

 

The most exciting thing about him, though, is that this old guy actually had an orange crown.  I’ve never seen one so orange, which makes me wonder if this fellow was closer to 10 years old than merely “ASY”. It is so sad to see such a vibrant, mature, elder statesman of a warbler cut down by something so stupid as a window.  He deserved better.

31 October 2016 – Orange-crowned Warbler

It felt like a big flight overnight, with migrant flight calls every time I walked outside. At least one of those migrants was this unfortunate little Orange-crowned Warbler:

This was an AHY-U bird with fat = 2.  As evident from the photo, this bird in the southwestern alcove appears not to have been saved by ABC Bird Tape.

28 October 2014 – trapped Orange-crowned Warbler

I found this feisty little warbler at the southwest alcove and released him to a nearby oak where he flew pretty strongly from my hand, scolding me the entire time.  Although it looks pretty Tennessee-y, the yellow undertail coverts you can’t see in the photos indicate Orange-crowned (although I’m happy to be corrected on that by those who might have more experience with these species).

Screen shot 2014-10-29 at 2.20.58 PM

DSCF7161 DSCF7162