21 May 2016 – Mourning Warbler and Yellow-billed Cuckoo

With apologies for the 1) poor and 2) non-existent photos . . .

I found an ASY male Mourning Warbler (fat = 0) at the main north entrance this morning. He was waaaaay better looking than these photos attest, and I bet he was even more handsome in life.

 

In the northwest alcove lay a female (with well-developed brood patch!) Yellow-billed Cuckoo (no photo).  I left the cuckoo in place, as the ants were already doing a number on her.

 

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In scavenging news, the starling from 5/18 was both moved and eaten: I found a remnant pile of its larger feathers about 5m away from the bird’s location. Whatever picked it up had taken it south to the bushes in front of the northern entrance.

1 September 2015 – Mourning Warbler

I found our 8th Mourning Warbler of the study on Sep. 1, in the southwest alcove. It looked to be an ASY female, but I did not handle it for close examination.  I left it for a scavenging trial.

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The backstory for this bird is that it actually died yesterday sometime after my morning check and before Corey’s 11:30 am check. This was a broad daylight collision.  I counted it here as a Sep. 1 fatality because I wouldn’t have discovered it until this morning had I been on my own.  I would have noticed that the bird was not a fresh casualty, but the best I could have done was say that it died sometime yesterday after my morning search and probably before midnight.  With Corey’s information, we now know that it was in place nearly 24 hrs before I detected it on my own.

19 August 2015 – Mourning Warbler

On the heels of an unusually powerful cold front – with temps struggling to the 70s! today – the Noble Research Center claimed its first real fall migrant this morning, in a HY-U Mourning Warbler.  This is the 7th Mourning Warbler on the project. This bird was young but it was in excellent shape and bulging with fat (scored a 3).  (Apologies for the non-standard photography.)

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Here’s last night’s flight on radar.  Birds were on the move both ahead of and behind the storm.

Around 10:00 pm last night:                                         Here’s the storm bearing down on us ~ 4:00 am:

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26 May 2015 – no casualties, but a correction

Thanks to concurrent surveys between Corey Riding’s project and my own, I learned Monday (5/25) of a bird that I had missed on Sunday (5/24): At the north entrance and tucked under some shrubs is a Mourning Warbler.  I missed the bird on two consecutive surveys.  Corey thinks it must have come in sometime during the day on Saturday (5/23).

I’m not too upset to have missed this bird – twice! – because it is waterlogged and cryptic against the background mulch on which it lies and I could only see it from a specific angle that I rarely take when investigating that section of shrubbery.  The key is not to never miss a bird on a survey, it’s to conduct redundant surveys to estimate how many I might be missing. Thankfully, that number seems to be quite low, but we’ll know better what it actually is in a few months.

Both Mourning Warbler and the Swainson’s Thrush were in place this morning.

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13 September 2013: trapped Eastern Wood-Pewee and Mourning Warbler

I had two trapped birds at the Noble Research Center this morning, both of which presented identification challenges because they were in good enough shape that I never got to examine them closely.  I first found what turned out to be a wood-pewee (and I’m assuming it’s Eastern) at the northeast alcove and then found a warbler I’ve identified as Mourning at the northwest alcove.  I was able to steer both birds away from the building so I am hoping that I won’t find them dead there tomorrow morning.

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Here’s the wood-pewee.  When I first came upon it, it was sitting on the ground, its long, low shape and attenuated bill had me momentarily thinking it was a swallow.  As I approached (within just a few feet) it was clear that I actually had a flycatcher, but it wasn’t until it flushed to perch on a nearby railing that I figured out that it wasn’t an Eastern Phoebe.

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This bird was intermediate in size between a phoebe and and Empidonax flycatcher.  It lacked the white throat of an Eastern Phoebe, it showed a bi-colored bill, and it did not wag its tail.  Relative to Empidonax flycatchers, this bird was larger and lankier, with a long primary projection, little to no greenish cast on the upperparts, no obvious eyering, and a dusky grayish vest.  All signs point to it being a wood-pewee, and I can only assume it’s Eastern as I wouldn’t be able to distinguish it from an extralimital Western in a photograph.  The buffy wingbars suggest a hatch-year bird. This is the first wood-pewee on the project, and here’s where Easterns have been reported this month:

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The Mourning Warbler on the northwest side of the Noble Research Center was also in good enough condition to fly off on its own, so I was left with my crude photographs to make the identification.  At first blush, the olive-green upperparts, yellow breast and throat, and grayish head suggested Nashville Warbler.  The structure didn’t fit well, however.  The bill wasn’t narrow enough for Nashville, and the pale lower mandible didn’t fit either.  The eye-ring seemed thin, and broken, unlike the bold, complete eyering on a Nashville.  The feet were big and pale, as opposed to a Nashville’s small, blackish feet.  The yellow throat pegged the bird as hatch-year, but I’m reluctant to call the sex.

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2 September 2013 – bonus Mourning Warbler

No casualties at the Noble Research Center this morning, but I found this bonus Mourning Warbler on the south side of the Food and Ag Products Center.

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This was a hatch year bird, and probably a female.  She was in prime shape for migration, with fat = 2.  No Mourning Warbler should end up stiff on a sidewalk in Oklahoma.  Here’s where these birds are supposed to be in the first two days of September:

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