10 September 2018 – Magnolia Warbler

This morning in the southwestern alcove I found the third Magnolia Warbler on the project. This monster was 7.5g, fat = 0, and looked to be a HY male.

 

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15 May 2018 – Magnolia Warbler and a trapped Clay-colored Sparrow

I found a trapped Clay-colored Sparrow today in the southwestern alcove. Upon release in the relative safety of a nearby shrub, the bird flew off another 5m or so to another shrub, where it perched strongly.

Less lucky was the Magnolia Warbler I found in the northwest alcove. This bird, a female with fat = 3, was just the second of this species documented on this project.

12 May 2013 – Magnolia Warbler

The 46th species and 128th casualty on this project knocked me for a loop:  An after-second-year male Magnolia Warbler.  The bird had been in excellent shape (fat = 2) despite being a bit out of range. 

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Magnolia Warbler is considered “rare” everywhere in Oklahoma except during migration in the eastern part of our state.  This is the second I’ve found since moving here in 2003. The first was a bird I found in a flock of Nashville Warblers in September 2009.  Check out eBird accounts for OK and the Texas Panhandle:

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The Maggie hit the same window (northwest alcove) as the Ruby-throated Hummingbird did a few days ago.  The hummingbird remains in place.

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This final shot illustrates the riot of color and pattern on a male Magnolia Warbler.  From aft to stern, there is blue-gray, brown-gray, black, olive streaked black, bright yellow, olive streaked black again, and black.  We might not think of this species when asked about “North America’s most beautiful bird”, but to me it’s in the top 10.

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