13 October 2016 – trapped Lincoln’s Sparrow

Today I found a stunned Lincoln’s Sparrow on the south portico (no photo).

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The bird couldn’t fly well, but it could fly.  I decided to give it the “perch test” to determine if I should consider it to be a casualty or simply a trapped bird. Once able to catch it, I walked the bird south toward Edmond Low Library and found it a dense and secluded place to perch and rest where it might feel protected – or at least better protected than out in the open of the portico.  I was pleased to see that the bird grasped a branch strongly and seemed to perch well.  This one had me on the fence a bit, but I ultimately logged it as trapped. Though stunned, it seemed otherwise healthy with fat score = 2.

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26 May 2015 – no casualties, but a correction

Thanks to concurrent surveys between Corey Riding’s project and my own, I learned Monday (5/25) of a bird that I had missed on Sunday (5/24): At the north entrance and tucked under some shrubs is a Mourning Warbler.  I missed the bird on two consecutive surveys.  Corey thinks it must have come in sometime during the day on Saturday (5/23).

I’m not too upset to have missed this bird – twice! – because it is waterlogged and cryptic against the background mulch on which it lies and I could only see it from a specific angle that I rarely take when investigating that section of shrubbery.  The key is not to never miss a bird on a survey, it’s to conduct redundant surveys to estimate how many I might be missing. Thankfully, that number seems to be quite low, but we’ll know better what it actually is in a few months.

Both Mourning Warbler and the Swainson’s Thrush were in place this morning.

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24 May 2015 – the first Ovenbird

This morning I found the 51st species casualty on the project – a horribly drenched Ovenbird that needed a couple of hours in front of my space heater to dry out and reclaim its former beauty.

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Can you see it? I can.

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At this point, I already knew what it was. That belly was just too white.

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This was a southeast alcove casualty:

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Once dried and re-sheveled, I could tell that this beauty was an after-second-year bird, but its sex could not be determined.  What was obvious was that it was bulging with fat in the furcular hollow and all across the belly.  This bird was in prime condition.

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