3 November 2016 – 2 Lincoln’s Sparrows

The south portico was the scene for the sad demise of two HY Lincoln’s Sparrows this morning. One was fat = 2 and the other was fat = 3.

2 November 2016 – at first no casualties, but then . . .

I received a message of a Carolina Chickadee dead at the southwestern alcove that was found late morning/early afternoon.  This one looked like a HY-U bird, and it was at least a 2 on my fat score index. It seemed odd to me that a chickadee would be laying down fat at this time of year – and we’re still having daytime temps in the 80s – but there just seems to be a lot more movement of chickadees than we (or at least, I) had generally realized.

This bird was another victim of a window pane treated with ABC’s bird tape.

 

19 October 2016 – Lincoln’s Sparrow and Common Yellowthroat

Flight calls abounded last night as I walked the dog at least thrice.  Those calls – little tsips! and tseeps! sounded to me like sparrows flowing from the north after three straight days of strong winds blowing from the south. A quick check of Paul Hurtado’s Nexrad radar birds page confirmed a big push in Midwest and the Plains:

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Sadly, with that push came two casualties at the Noble Research Center: a Lincoln’s Sparrow (AHY-U with fat = 2) at the southwest alcove and a Common Yellowthroat (AHY-M with fat = 2) at the northwest alcove.  (Apologies for the shaky portrait on the Yellowthroat – it looked clear on my phone.)

 

Although casualties continue to pile up in the west alcoves where I’ve treated several windows with ABC Bird Tape, it has so far appeared to be the untreated panes in those alcoves that are claiming the casualties.

17 September 2016 – trapped Northern Waterthrush

So far, it’s exclusively been the southwestern alcove causing the problems this fall. That’s a bit ironic and potentially problematic, as I’ve completed more window treatments there than anywhere else on the building.  However, none of the four birds that has ended up there has been found in front of a treated window, leaving open the suggestion that the treated windows have not cause any casualties, even if casualties have occurred at the partially treated alcove.

This morning, I found the first bird actually in front of a treated window pane: a Northern Waterthrush. The hopeful difference is that this bird was ALIVE.

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Above right – Yep, that little white dot in the photo on the right is waterthrush splay in front of the window where I first encountered the bird.