22, 24, 29, & 31 January 2018 – no casualties

Here’s a bit of a retrospective on the past year, though. I arbitrarily divide the calendar year into spring (Mar–Jul) and fall (Aug–Feb) monitoring. We’ve still got February to go, but my data aren’t likely to change much before the end of this next month.

The irony of having marked some windows in 2016 and seeing a new high count of dead birds in 2017 is not lost on me. I’m not sure what to think of that other than a standard admonition against drawing conclusions from just a year of data. Either way, 2017 was startling. My previous high count of 41 casualties occurred in 2010. The ensuing 5 years accrued fewer than 30; last year we were back up to 40. The 2010–2016 average was 37. Thus, the 61 casualties I found in 2017 was fairly shocking.

Screen Shot 2018-01-31 at 9.58.05 AMScreen Shot 2018-01-31 at 9.58.46 AM

Advertisements

28 November 2017 – two Dark-eyed Juncos

Both on the west side; one north and one south. Both evidently adult males, too.  I left both in place for a removal trial.

7–18 October 2017 – all kinds of stuff

I’ve been behind with stacks of papers to grade, and they’ve kept me from keeping up as often as I’d prefer. During the period from October 7–18, I conducted 8 surveys, skipping Oct. 8, 14, and 15. The data from these last 11 days look a bit like this:

  • Oct. 7: HOWR
  • Oct. 9: no casualties
  • Oct. 10: no casualties
  • Oct. 11: LISP
  • Oct. 12: TUTI
  • Oct. 13: no casualties
  • Oct. 16: OCWA, SOSP, LISP, and NAWA
  • Oct. 17: no casualties
  • Oct. 18: no casualties

Just past mid-October, and we are crushing the annual mortality count right now with 55 dead birds.

Oct. 7 – I found just the third House Wren on the project.  This one ended up on a warm air outflow grate from the air conditioning unit and was quickly desiccated.

Screen Shot 2017-10-12 at 5.44.08 PM

Oct. 11 – I collected this Lincoln’s Sparrow from the south portico.

Oct. 12 – This Tufted Titmouse was a surprise in the southwestern alcove.

Oct. 16 – This was not a good day for migrants. I found an Orange-crowned Warbler at the northeast alcove, a Song Sparrow at the south portico, and a Lincoln’s Sparrow at the southwestern alcove. Shortly after completing my survey, a Nashville Warbler was turned in from a collision in the southwestern alcove.

 

Screen Shot 2017-10-17 at 4.25.38 PM

 

29 September 2017 – Lincoln’s Sparrow

It’s sad to realize that the real harbinger of autumn here in Stillwater is the first Lincoln’s Sparrow casualty at the Noble Research Center.