5 November 2016 – Fox Sparrow and Dark-eyed Junco

I did not get a chance to check the Noble Research Center until 4:00 pm today but when I did there was a sad surprise at the northeastern alcove. It looks for all the world like these two were traveling together, although I certainly cannot establish that to be the case:

AHY-F Dark-eyed Junco, fat = 0.

AHY-U Fox Sparrow, fat = 1.

This is just the second Fox Sparrow I’ve found on this project.

Advertisements

2 March 2011 – 1 stunned junco

I found a Dark-eyed Junco near a west alcove entryway this morning.  The bird was sitting tight and fluffed up, but not panting and showed no signs of blood.  It allowed capture by hand, but did squirm a call a few times.   Upon release in the junipers near Cordell Hall, the bird flew straight to a branch and perched steadily.  I think this one might make it, so I will not count it as a casualty.

Six-month summary: July–December 2010

Here is just a quick summary of casualties at the Noble Research Center from July through December 2010:


Very fat Mourning Warbler that never made it to the wintering grounds.

I detected 25 individuals of at least 16 species among the casualties. The complete list:

grasshopper sparrow – 4
ruby-throated hummingbird – 2
mourning warbler – 2
song sparrow – 2
Lincoln’s sparrow – 2
unidentified passerine (1 warbler, 1 sparrow) – 2
black-and-white warbler – 1
Carolina wren – 1
mourning dove (juv) – 1
least flycatcher – 1
common yellowthroat – 1
black-throated green warbler – 1
brown thrasher – 1
house wren – 1
red-breasted nuthatch – 1
white-throated sparrow – 1
field sparrow – 1

Because I was able to get to the NRC earlier each day during autumn than practical in 2009, I encountered more individuals that were stunned and “trapped” by the building for some time period without obvious mortal injury. Most of these birds are presumed to have eventually moved on, but it is quite likely that the house wren and one of the Lincoln’s sparrows on the “stunned” list were unsuccessful in their respective bids to escape from the confusion of the NRC, and are listed above. The bat represents the first mammalian “capture” by the NRC:

Lincoln’s sparrow – 5 (4 in one flock)
house wren – 1
common yellowthroat – 1
Nashville warbler – 1
grasshopper sparrow – 1
dark-eyed junco – 1


It’s dark when migrants like this Lincoln’s sparrow drop out of the sky and try to find a good spot in which to rest for the day. I’m beginning to think that most collisions are occurring in that last hour before sunrise.

1 December 2010 – bonus Ag Hall casualty

Found this Dark-eyed Junco outside the northwest corner window of Ag Hall this morning. That window has produced multiple juncos, cedar waxwings, Swainson’s trush, and an orange-crowned warbler. It’s a good example of how a single window on a building without a large amount of plate glass can be problematic. I concentrate my efforts on the big, glassy Noble Research Center, but I doubt if Ag Hall is all that much behind in the “dead bird” race.

Bonus Ag Hall casualty – 8 November 2010

I noticed this poor junco yesterday morning (11/8). It’s just a few feet from this Mourning Warbler that hit the same window on May 17, and this Sharp-shinned Hawk that hit that same window on Oct. 16, 2009. So the same window has now claimed at least three individuals of three different species in a little more than a year. If you look out from the north window on the 2nd floor of Ag Hall, you can see the junco and the mummified remains of the Mourning Warbler.


See the junco? This is the perspective from which I first noticed all three birds.

Bonus casualties this week

North winds brought in lots of migrants this week, and that led to more birds coming to my attention elsewhere on campus. Ag Hall claimed an Orange-crowned Warbler this week, and there was a very fresh Dark-eyed Junco across the street at the Food and Agricultural Products Center.