25 August 2019 – Yellow Warbler

There was a male Yellow Warbler at the southwestern alcove today.

23 August 2019 – Indigo Bunting and Mourning Warbler

As storms rolled through overnight, I assumed I might find a casualty this morning. There were two: a completely rain-soaked female Indigo Bunting in the southwestern alcove and a completely dry and fluffy Mourning Warbler at the south entrance under the rain protection provided by the portico’s overhanging roof. The latter was an AHY male with fat = 3.

18 August 2019 – Painted Bunting

I found another Painted Bunting this morning, this time in the southwestern alcove. This one looked to be a second-year female with a still-evident brood patch.

 

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15 August 2019 – Painted Bunting

I did not do a survey yesterday (14th), but this Painted Bunting at the main north entrance looked as if it had been in place since at least yesterday morning. Nonetheless, it will be recorded as a casualty of the 15th.

13 August 2019 – Ruby-throated Hummingbird

Found a Ruby-throated Hummingbird at the main north entrance this morning.

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August 2009–July 2019: Ten Year Milestone

Ahead of the official official ten-year anniversary of window collision monitoring at the Noble Research Center on August 20th, here’s a recap of my very first post from 7 September, 2009.

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Those were heady days, indeed.

Here are some basic things I’ve observed and learned, August 2009–July 2019.

With some occasional help when I’ve been out of town, we surveyed the perimeter of the Noble Research Center for window-collided birds 2,141 times. I’ve generally run surveys every day (usually within about two hours of sunrise) during heavy migration periods in  autumn and spring, scaling back to more like weekly surveys during the dead of winter.

Including 4 unidentified passerine remains, at least 414 individuals of 67 species died in window collisions at the Noble Research Center.

The most frequently encountered casualties were:

  1. Lincoln’s Sparrow 51
  2. Ruby-throated Hummingbird 36
  3. Painted Bunting 26
  4. Indigo Bunting 23
  5. Grasshopper Sparrow 20
  6. Clay-colored Sparrow 18
  7. Mourning Dove 17
  8. Nashville Warbler 16
  9. Mourning Warbler 15

Tenth is a four-way tie with 11 casualties each for Common Yellowthroat, Orange-crowned Warbler, Song Sparrow, and Yellow Warbler.

The spatial distribution of those casualties looks a bit like this:

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Collision casualties at the Noble Research Center, Stillwater, OK, 2017

Window treatments applied to selected panes in 2016 have, evidently, not contributed to a decline in collisions.

I plan to continue my monitoring at the NRC for as long as I can, and in the next 10 years hope to appreciably reduce the mortality here.