7 May 2019 – two Indigo Buntings

Today, there was a second-year male Indigo Bunting in the northwestern alcove and a female in the southwestern alcove.

6 May 2019 – Summer Tanager

This morning was a bit odd in that it’s rare to find window killed Summer Tanagers at the NRC, and that someone had moved yesterday’s Yellow Warbler. Now the warbler and tanager lie together at the main north entrance, and I can only assume that the tanager died very close by. (The Summer Tanager was a second-year male.)

 

5 May 2019 – Yellow Warbler

To me, these window kills are saddest when the victim is an older individual in its prime. Case in point, consider this outstanding male Yellow Warbler from this morning that senselessly met its end at the main north entrance. Note, too how conspicuous these casualties can sometimes be. As soon as I got a glimpse of the north entrance I could tell there was a casualty there.

4 May 2019 – Swainson’s Thrush and Summer Tanager

This morning there was a Swainson’s Thrush – visible from a long way off – in the southwestern alcove. Later in the day, Sirena Lao provided the photos of a female Summer Tanager, also from the southwestern alcove.

 

 

3 May 2019 – Orange-crowned Warbler

The darkness of these photos illustrates how rainy and gloomy we were when this poor Orange-crowned Warbler met its end at the northeastern alcove. This bird was removed/scavenged on 7 May.

2 May 2019 – no casualties, but then yes casualties

There were no new casualties on my survey from about 7:30 this morning, but then the sharp eyes of students Dalton Deshazer, Jake Rowland, and Corey Sage noticed this Yellow-billed Cuckoo in the southwestern alcove. (On my check the next day, the bird had been moved off the sidewalk and was much less conspicuous. It persisted until removal on May 5th.)

As a bonus, Corey Sage provided this photo of a trapped Cedar Waxwing, also at the southwestern entrance, later that afternoon.