22 October 2018 – White-throated Sparrow plus a bonus Song Sparrow

This morning I found another White-throated Sparrow. In the last two days, the number of this species I’ve found since 2009 has doubled from two to four.  We’ve also reached a yearly milestone with now 50 casualties for 2018.

 

For a bit of added sadness, I also happened upon this Song Sparrow at the Kerr-Drummond complex.

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21 October 2018 – White-throated Sparrow

For only the third time since 2009 I found a window-killed White-throated Sparrow at the Noble Research Center.

19 October 2018 – Lincoln’s Sparrow, plus another Lincoln’s Sparrow

I found two Lincoln’s Sparrow victims today, both in somewhat odd places. At the Noble Research Center, one met its end at the door leading out to the eastern courtyard. This might be only the 2nd or 3rd victim in the courtyard since 2009.

I also occasionally check for window collision victims at the Food and Agricultural Products Center just to the west across the parking lot and Monroe St. This morning there was a Lincoln’s Sparrow in a tiny alcove where I’ve found birds in the past. This one I noticed by looking to my right as I drove down the street this morning.

18 October 2018 – Lincoln’s Sparrow, Hermit Thrush, and Nashville Warbler

Tough week here on campus as the casualties pile up.

Today, the northeast alcove had a Lincoln’s Sparrow and the project’s first Hermit Thrush. This now make casualties confirmed for 65 species at the Noble Research Center. The main north entrance claimed a Nashville Warbler, too.

 

Sex was undetermined for all three, but the Nashville Warbler was probably a female. The thrush and warbler looked to be after hatch year, while the sparrow was a hatch year bird. Thrush and sparrow had some fat lain down (I marked each a “one”), but I couldn’t find any fat on the warbler.

Nashville Warbler: 8.0 g

Lincoln’s Sparrow: 15.5 g

Hermit Thrush: 27.0 g

 

 

 

17 October 2018 – four Lincoln’s Sparrows

It was one of those tough days to be a Lincoln’s Sparrow on campus today. There were dead birds at the main north entrance and on the south portico. I examined the south portico bird which looked to be HY-U, with fat = 3. There were two more trapped Lincoln’s Sparrows I flushed from the main north entrance. They flew away strongly, showing no evidence of collision.

16 October 2018 – Lincoln’s Sparrow and a bob-tailed House Wren

My first Lincoln’s Sparrow of the year showed up at the northwestern alcove today. I do much prefer to see them alive beneath my feeders. . .

Another feathered friend was very much alive, though stunned from a collision in southeastern entrance. He looked a bit shaky when I first found him, but he was actually fairly perky and difficult to catch. As it was chilly in the shade, I took the bird to a sunny spot near my office where he could more safely and quickly recover. Checking on the bird a bit later in the day, it was still there but flying strongly and looking to be recovering.

This bird was a wren of ambiguous affinity. It’s short tail was evocative of Winter Wren, but its plumage was a better match for House Wren. The bob tail might indicate a HY bird, but I didn’t spend much time examining its plumage for aging as my main concern was to make sure it had a safe place to chill out.

15 October 2018 – Clay-colored Sparrow

I found a Clay-colored Sparrow in the northwestern corner entrance to the NRC this morning, following the first big front of fall with frost near Woodward. I left the bird in place and it was scavenged by the next morning.

 

7–12 October 2018 – no casualties, but a trapped Palm Warbler on the 12th

Lots of birds on the move this past week but, thankfully, none appears to have met its end at the Noble Research Center. The Palm Warbler – first I’ve ever found on campus – seemed a bit confused but unharmed. It was in the stairwell of the northeast alcove and popped up into the sugar maple tree on my arrival.

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5 October 2018 – Two Nashville Warblers and a Clay-colored Sparrow

It was a bit foggy overnight so perhaps that contributed to the casualties I found today: An AHY male Nashville Warbler in the southwestern alcove (fat = 3) and a Clay-colored Sparrow in the south portico (fat = 2).

The one bright spot was the second Nashville Warbler. It was stunned but alive. On my approach it perked up and flew off strongly.

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24 September 2018 – Yellow Warbler

I found this Yellow Warbler in the southwestern alcove this morning. Female, possibly hatch year but I was unsure on the age; fat = 2.