4 April 2017 – trapped Song Sparrow

No casualties yet, but I’m up to the 3rd trapped bird of the new year: a Song Sparrow in the northwest alcove.  This one was stunned – or exhausted – but before I could get any closer than about 3m it flew away strongly – good sign!

 

This bird was likely riding a wave of migration that really lit up the radar last night (as linked from Paul Hurtado’s birding page). Check out the big blue blobs in Oklahoma from a little after 11 pm last night:

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Keep your eye on that slug of rain and storms (the green, yellow, and red) in the OK Panhandle, though.

Now check out the line of rain and storms that moved in overnight and set up shop on the Kansas border.  This is from a bit before 6:00 am, and nobody moving north through our state kept on moving through that!  This is a classic setup for a “fallout” of birds.  More storms today followed by strong north winds tomorrow will likely keep some staging migrants around for a few more days.

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3 April 2017 – trapped Common Yellowthroat

I found this rather early fellow right in front of the doorway to the southeast alcove this morning. He’s a gorgeous, ASY male Common Yellowthroat with fat score = 1. He was dazed enough that I caught him but alert and feisty in the hand, and he perched well when I moved him to a safe spot.  In addition to being one of history’s all-time great yellowthroats, he has the distinction of being the 100th “trapped” bird that I’ve been able to move or shoo away from the Noble Research Center.  If even one of them recovered enough to fly on and live out its life then every one of these walks around the NRC has been worth it!

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Unfortunately, something went screwy with my camera and this is the only surviving photo:

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20 March 2017 – trapped Northern Cardinal

Spring kicked off today with the first collision victim of 2017: a trapped Northern Cardinal at the northeast alcove.

 

He was a bit stunned, but alert in the hand and he perched strongly in the dense cover where I moved him away from the building.  Beautiful ASY male; I hope he makes a full recovery!