15 June 2016 – Number 250

This morning, a dead Tufted Titmouse achieved some grim and arbitrary notoriety as the 250th window-killed bird I’ve found at the Noble Research Center since monitoring began on 20 August 2009. She’s right near the entrance to the northwest alcove, and I left her in place to see how long it takes for her to be removed.

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Like so many birds I find in June, this was a female (AHY) with a brood patch. This one had a faint stripe of mulberry juice down the front of her breast and little on her beak.

 

Intrigued by the pattern, I queried my database for June casualties, 2009–2016.  Out of 22 window-kills, at least 8 have been females with brood patches (and additional 7 might have been but the data weren’t recorded).

13 June 2016 – Field Sparrow

I found a second-year female Field Sparrow at the main north entrance this morning.

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This female too, had a well developed brood patch.  She also had some fat laid down; I’d say coded a 2. Here again, it looks like we’ve got post-breeding dispersal on display.

9–12 June 2016 – casualties [updated]

Thanks to Corey Riding & Co. for checking the Noble Research Center while I was away on 6/9 and 6/10.

The cuckoo and House Finch carcasses remain.

I learned on 6/15 that Chrissy Barton from Corey Riding’s team actually did find a window-killed Black-and-White Warbler on the evening of 6/11.  The bird is a SY female, and I think I see a gap in the breast feathers that would point to a brood patch . . .

 

 

 

7 June 2016 – Carolina Chickadee

“It’s early June – I bet that’s a female with a brood patch.”

Indeed it was.

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5 June 2016 – House Finch

Today marked the first casualty of a species that is common and conspicuous on campus – a House Finch at the southwestern alcove.  As seems to be the case with resident birds, June is evidently a time for post-breeding dispersal, and this bird was, like many June casualties before her, a female with a brood patch.

I left her in place for a removal trial.Screen Shot 2016-06-07 at 9.18.02 AM